DAD DND

This is a cross-post with DAN a.k.a. DAD — read it here, or read it there. Today’s post is not about my adorable daughter Jean Louise. It relates more to one of the hardships of being a father — managing to still be able to enjoy the other things in life, like hobbies and camaraderie. In this case… Playing Dungeons & Dragons. As rewarding as fatherhood may be… The call to explore dungeons and slay dragons must be answered.

No, the title is not “DAD DNA.” It’s “DAD DND,” and it refers to Dungeons & Dragons. Dad DNA is a whole different subject for a whole different kind of post. So, what in the hell is DAD DND? In addition to being a forty-nine year old father of a one year old daughter, I began playing Dungeons & Dragons over forty years ago. Playing DnD (or D&D) and other role-playing games were a big part of my life for the following two decades. Over the last twenty years, while I have played here and there, I haven’t been able to sneak my teeth into a good ol’ regular DnD game for awhile now. And with being a dad now, my time is even more limited. My DnD experiences are now lived vicariously through others on various Dungeons & Dragons game podcasts. Having co-hosted a podcast for over a year and a half now (Starmageddon — a podcast for fans of Star Trek AND Star Wars) I figured why not get together four or five other dads that are itching to play, utilize an online virtual tabletop, record the shenanigans, and produce a podcast called DAD DND? So… That’s what I plan to do.

I posted the above “recruitment poster” in a Facebook Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition group and the response has been overwhelming — positive even. Many other dads who play Dungeons & Dragons think that it’s a nifty idea and are asking how they can be a part of the podcast. Obviously, I can’t run a DnD game that includes everyone who has expressed interest in participating. We’re talking well over a hundred or so DnD dads. I’m not that good of a Dungeon Master. I’m going to have to figure out a fair and reasonable way to determine who’s on board. As pretentious as it sounds, I might have to run some sort of audition process.

If you’re thinking that you may want to be part of the DAD DND podcast. Awesome. But first you might want to get a better idea of the kind of podcast that I (Dan Taylor, your host and DM) run. While the format for DAD DND will be actual gameplay of Dungeons & Dragons by four or five additional player dads, and not news discussion and interviews, you might want to give my other podcast Starmageddon a listen. It’s a Star Trek AND Star Wars centric podcast that can be found at the following podcast feed providers: iTunes, Podbean, Stitcher, and/or your favorite podcast provider (maybe.)

For more info on DAD DND please check out the DAD DND Facebook page and/or follow @daddndcom on Twitter. You can also bookmark dandnd.com and be on the ground floor when the site launches in full.

Save

Save

Save

Save

NO. ABE VIGODA IS NOT ALIVE

2016 saw the deaths of many notable celebrities. And while many such as David Bowie, Prince, Muhammad Ali, and Carrie Fisher just to name a few (again, of many). There was one celebrity death that stood out to me more than the others — Abe Vigoda.

Unless you’re a fan of the 1972 movie The Godfather, and/or the first three seasons of the late ’70s television show Barney Miller, you might not remember who Abe Vigoda was. he was Salvatore Tessio in The Godfather and Fish in Barney Miller. He was a comedian and character actor, who for better or worse, was usually cast as someone who appeared to be knocking on Heaven’s door.

In 1982, People magazine mistakenly ran a story stating that Vigoda was dead. He was alive and well, performing a play in Calgary at the age of sixty. In 1987, a preporter for WWOR, Channel 9 in Secaucus, New Jersey, referred to him as the “late Abe Vigoda.” In May of 2001, the website abevigoda.com was launched. Its sole purpose was to report the status of whether Vigoda was alive or dead. For nearly fifteen years this website existed just because the general populace assumed that Abe Vigoda was dead. Abe Vigoda and the is he or isn’t he condition of his mortality was often comedy fodder for the likes of Jeff Rosss, Billy Crystal, David Letterman, and Conan O’Brien.

So what’s the bid deal with Abe Vigoda’s passing in 2016? Well, he died in January along with other notable celebrities Bowie, Alan Rickman, Dan Haggerty (well, notable to me — Grizzly Adams), and Glen Frey. After taking the lives of those four celebrities, I’m think thinking Death — yeah, the skeleton guy in the long dark hooded robe that carries around a scythe — got a bit cocky and went for the one game that had eluded him for at nearly a quarter of a century — Abe Vigoda. After Death made Vigoda give up the ghost, he went on a life-ending spree throughout the remaining calendar year.

And then that cocky sonofabithch Death started doubling down. Abe Vigoda wasn’t the only former cast member of Barney Miller he claimed. Ron Glass, who played Detective Harris on the series. And, not to mention, the beloved Shepherd Book on Firefly and in Serenity. Kenny Baker, who played Artoo-Detoo in the Star Wars films passed away in August. Then late in December, Death claimed Princess Leia herself, Carrie Fisher — a Star Wars twofer. But, he didn’t stop there — Fisher’s mother, icon Debbie Reynolds the very next day. And David Bowie wasn’t the only international pop star either — Prince and George Michael passed away in 2016 as well. Sports legends weren’t safe either — besides boxing legend Muhammad Ali, Death claimed golf legend Arnold Palmer, hockey legend Gordie Howe, and baseball legend Joe Garagiola.

2016 seemed to many as the year of celebrity deaths. But honestly, celebrities die every year — many of them. It may be that I’m at the age when notable celebrities that either inspired, influenced, entertained, or were just part of my day-to-day media absorption throughout my life, or finally coming to an end of their own.

Hey, Death. Feel free to take some time off in 2017. Take a lot of time off. You’ve earned it.

Happy New Year.

Update: As I readied to hit the publish button I read online that M*A*S*H actor William Christopher, who played Father Mulcahy, passed away today — the last day of 2016. On December 31, 2015, M*A*S*H actor Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John, died — exactly one year to the day. Now you’re just fucking with us, Death.

Save

Save

Save

Save